Pinky and blue boy paintings

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pinky and blue boy paintings

Today we thought it would be fun to give some background and trivia on the paintings "The Blue Boy" and "Pinkie". These famous paintings are.

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Today we thought it would be fun to give some background and trivia on the paintings "The Blue Boy" and "Pinkie". These famous paintings are more interesting than you might have realized! Both of these paintings were painted with oil on canvas, and are full length portraits painted in the 18th century. However, this is where the similarities end. The boy in the painting was not a royal, as some guess, but actually a boy named Jonathan Buttall.

Purchased by Henry E. Huntington in the s, the two masterpieces have resided together in the railroad magnate's mansion-turned-art gallery in San Marino, California, for more than seventy years. Who were the children in these paintings and why did these leading artists choose them as subjects? These and many other intriguing questions are answered by renowned art historian Robert R. Sixteen color plates feature Pinkie and the Blue Boy as well as other related paintings.

The Blue Boy has been using his defiant stare and unique fashion sense to transfix viewers for centuries. In painting The Blue Boy at some point around , Gainsborough borrowed more than the regal-yet-relaxed look that the 17th century Flemish painter achieved in his portraits. Art historians debated the identity of this posh-looking lad for centuries. Gainsborough had a heated rivalry with his portrait-painting peer Sir Joshua Reynolds. Some art historians have suggested that The Blue Boy was conceived as a glorious means of refuting Reynold's declarations on color. Specifically, Reynolds believed:. In , an X-ray was taken of the painting that revealed the canvas had once been an incomplete painting of an older man, before it was cut down and repainted with the boy.

Pinkie is the traditional title for a portrait made in by Thomas Lawrence in the permanent collection of the Huntington Library at San Marino, California where it hangs opposite The Blue Boy by Thomas Gainsborough. The title now given it by the museum is Sarah Barrett Moulton: Pinkie. These two works are the centerpieces of the institute's art collection, which specialises in eighteenth-century English portraiture. The painting is an elegant depiction of Sarah Barrett Moulton , who was about eleven years old when painted. Her direct gaze and the loose, energetic brushwork give the portrait a lively immediacy. James , Jamaica. Sarah was baptised on 29 May , bearing the names Sarah Goodin Barrett in honour of her aunt, also named Sarah Goodin Barrett, who had died as an infant in

They are the subjects of endless reproductions, porcelain figurines, commemorative plates and all manner of kitsch. Two youths betrothed to one another by the place they shared on a museum wall. The girl in pink and the boy in blue; how perfect is that? The truth of the matter is, that is a very twentieth century construct. Pink and blue were worn by both genders for centuries. For the longest time blue was actually more thought of with girls due to its association with The Virgin Mary. The Blue Boy was actually green when it came into the possession of H.



Thanks, Debbie. I did indeed assume they were a pair. Shows I didn't do my research! I guess we can't research everything, but it is nice here, picking up bits and pieces every day. Thanks for this, Debbie.

The Blue Boy c. Perhaps Gainsborough's most famous work, it is thought to be a portrait of Jonathan Buttall , the son of a wealthy hardware merchant, although this has never been proven. It is a historical costume study as well as a portrait: the youth in his seventeenth-century apparel is regarded as Gainsborough's homage to Anthony van Dyck , and in particular is very close to Van Dyck's portrait of Charles II as a boy. Gainsborough had already drawn something on the canvas before beginning The Blue Boy , which he painted over. Gainsborough painted the portrait in response to the advice of his rival Sir Joshua Reynolds , [3] who had written:. It ought, in my opinion, to be indispensably observed, that the masses of light in a picture be always of a warm, mellow colour, yellow, red, or a yellowish white, and that the blue, the grey, or the green colours be kept almost entirely out of these masses, and be used only to support or set off these warm colours; and for this purpose, a small proportion of cold colour will be sufficient. Let this conduct be reversed; let the light be cold, and the surrounding colour warm, as we often see in the works of the Roman and Florentine painters, and it will be out of the power of art, even in the hands of Rubens and Titian, to make a picture splendid and harmonious.

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1 thoughts on “Pinky and blue boy paintings

  1. Pinkie owes part of its notability to its association with the Gainsborough portrait The Blue Boy. According to.

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