Who went on the bataan death march and why

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Bataan Death March

who went on the bataan death march and why

Who went on the Bataan Death March, and why? Allied prisoners of war, because the Japanese forced them to. Which of the following events turned the tide of.

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Survivors of the Bataan Death March. During World War II, on April 9, , 75, United States soldiers and Filipino soldiers were surrendered to Japanese forces after months of battling in extreme-climate conditions. The U. Soon after the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, , Japanese forces began the invasion of the Philippines. It would bring them one step closer to the control of the Southwest Pacific. The Philippines were just as important to the U. Having troops in the Philippines gave the U.

After the April 9, U. The marchers made the trek in intense heat and were subjected to harsh treatment by Japanese guards. Thousands perished in what became known as the Bataan Death March. The day after Japan bombed the U. Within a month, the Japanese had captured Manila, the capital of the Philippines, and the American and Filipino defenders of Luzon the island on which Manila is located were forced to retreat to the Bataan Peninsula. For the next three months, the combined U. Finally, on April 9, with his forces crippled by starvation and disease, U.

In the case of the Philippines, however, this initial strike was followed by a full-scale invasion of the main island of Luzon three days later. By early January, the American and Filipino defenders were forced to retreat to a slim defensive position on the island's western Bataan Peninsula. American prisoners, some with their hands behind their backs, get a brief respite during the march. The American and Filipino forces fought from an untenable position until formally surrendering to the Japanese on April 9. The Japanese immediately began to march some 76, prisoners 12, Americans, the remainder Filipinos northward into captivity along a route of death. When three American officers escaped a year later, the world learned of the unspeakable atrocities suffered along the mile journey that became known as the Bataan Death March. Japanese butchery, disease, exposure to the blazing sun, lack of food, and lack of water took the lives of approximately 5, Americans along the way.

The total distance marched from Mariveles to San Fernando and from the Capas Train Station to Camp O'Donnell is variously reported by differing sources as between 60 and Differing sources also report widely differing prisoner of war casualties prior to reaching Camp O'Donnell: from 5, to 18, Filipino deaths and to American deaths during the march. The march was characterized by severe physical abuse and wanton killings, and was later judged by an Allied military commission to be a Japanese war crime. When General MacArthur returned to active duty, the latest revision of plans for the defense of the Philippine Islands—called WPO-3—was politically unrealistic, assuming a conflict only involving the United States and Japan, not the combined Axis powers. However, the plan was tactically sound, and its provisions for defense were applicable under any local situation. If the enemy prevailed, the Americans were to make every attempt to hold back the Japanese advance while withdrawing to the Bataan Peninsula, which was recognized as the key to the control of Manila Bay.



Bataan Death March , march in the Philippines of some 66 miles km that 76, prisoners of war 66, Filipinos, 10, Americans were forced by the Japanese military to endure in April , during the early stages of World War II. Mainly starting in Mariveles, on the southern tip of the Bataan Peninsula , on April 9, , the prisoners were force-marched north to San Fernando and then taken by rail in cramped and unsanitary boxcars farther north to Capas. During the main march—which lasted 5 to 10 days, depending on where a prisoner joined it—the captives were beaten, shot, bayoneted, and, in many cases, beheaded; a large number of those who made it to the camp later died of starvation and disease. Within hours of their December 7, , attack on the American naval base at Pearl Harbor , Hawaii , the Japanese military began its assault on the Philippines, bombing airfields and bases, harbours and shipyards. Manila , the capital of the Philippines, sits on Manila Bay , one of the best deepwater ports in the Pacific Ocean , and it was, for the Japanese, a perfect resupply point for their planned conquest of the southern Pacific. After the initial air attacks, 43, men of the Imperial Japanese 14th Army went ashore on December 22 at two points on the main Philippine island of Luzon.

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