British motor car and bicycle manufacturer from 1890

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Automotive industry in the United Kingdom

british motor car and bicycle manufacturer from 1890

Birth Of The Bike (1937)

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Many grand old British car brands are no longer around; we look at their chances of revival. There was a time when British car marques ruled the world, and brands such as Austin, Hillman and Morris were established in the furthest-flung outposts around the globe. As the 20th century progressed, empires shrunk and new world powers emerged, which saw the demise of many small and not-so-small automotive brands. Some of the worthier dead marques still retain a strong enough image to warrant a revival, fuelled by romance and the power of heritage. We look at some of the more interesting brands that could make a comebacků. This Belgian carriage builder supplied bodywork to car marques from , and to Brit brands Daimler, Bentley, Alvis and Rolls-Royce from Chance of revival: A very outside chance that Jaguar could one day apply it to American range-toppers.

The origins of the UK automotive industry date back to the final years of the 19th century. By the s the UK was the second-largest manufacturer of cars in the world after the United States and the largest exporter. Rights to many currently dormant marques, including Austin , Riley , Rover and Triumph , are also owned by foreign companies. Motorcars came into use on British roads during the early s, but initially relied entirely on imported vehicles. Simms acquired the British rights to Daimler's engine and associated patents and from successfully sold launches using these Cannstatt -made motors from Eel Pie Island in the Thames. Simms' documented plans to manufacture Daimler motors and Daimler Motor Carriages in Cheltenham were taken over, together with his company and its Daimler licences, by London company-promoter H J Lawson.

Riley [note 1] was a British motorcar and bicycle manufacturer from Riley became part of the Nuffield Organisation in and was merged into the British Leyland Motor Corporation in In during the pedal cycle craze that swept Britain at the end of the 19th century William Riley Jr. Riley's middle son, Percy, left school in the same year and soon began to dabble in automobiles. He built his first car at 16, in , secretly, because his father did not approve. It featured the first mechanically operated inlet valve. By , Percy Riley moved from producing motorcycles to his first prototype four-wheeled quadricycle.



John Kemp Starley

Riley was a British motorcar and bicycle manufacturer from The company became part of the Nuffield Organisation in and was later merged into British Leyland: late in British Leyland announced their discontinuance of Riley production, although was a difficult year for the UK auto industry and so a number of cars from the company's inventory are likely to have been first registered only in During the pedal cycle craze that swept Britain at the end of the nineteenth century, in , William Riley Jr.

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