Critical analysis of the old man and the sea

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A Critical Analysis of The Old Man and the Sea, a Novel by Ernest Hemingway

critical analysis of the old man and the sea

Top 10 Notes: The Old Man and the Sea

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Events of the novel take place at Cuba, approximately in September The Old Man and the Sea starts with a description of an old man, Santiago, a fisher who spent eighty-four days without any fare. Of course, it is offensive for Santiago who spent all his life at the sea and travelled a lot while being young. He also is an excellent and skillful fisherman, he just did not find a big fish worthy of selling for a long time. At first a boy, Manolin, was helping him, but after forty days without fare his parents forbade him to attend the old man, so now he works with another fisherman.

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There is an old fisherman in Cuba called Santiago , who has gone eighty-four days without a catch. He is "thin and gaunt with deep wrinkles in the back of his neck But none of these scars were fresh. They were as old as erosions in a fishless desert" Santiago's lack of success, though, does not destroy his spirit, and he has "cheerful and undefeated" eyes He has a single friend, a boy named Manolin , who helped him during the first forty days of his dryspell. After forty days, though, Manolin's parents decide the old man was unlucky and ordered their son to join another boat.

Book: The Old Man and the Sea. Topics: Critical , Evaluation. The main characters that are portrayed in this novel are Santiago, the old man and the main character of the story, Manolin, the young boy who looks up to the old man for guidance and also helps Santiago in any way he can and the fish, a marlin. The sharks also play a significant part of this tale. There are many themes that run throughout this novel including determination, heroism, courage, pride and perseverance.

A commonplace among literary authorities is that a work of truly great literature invites reading on multiple levels or re-reading at various stages in the reader's life. At each of these readings, the enduring work presumably yields extended interpretations and expanded meanings. Certainly, The Old Man and the Sea fits that description. The novella invites, even demands, reading on multiple levels. For example, readers can receive the novella as an engaging and realistic story of Santiago, the old man; Manolin, the young man who loves him; and Santiago's last and greatest battle with a giant marlin. Indeed, Hemingway himself insisted that the story was about a real man and a real fish.

It was his last major work of fiction. The story centres on an aging fisherman who engages in an epic battle to catch a giant marlin. The central character is an old Cuban fisherman named Santiago, who has not caught a fish for 84 days. The family of his apprentice, Manolin, has forced the boy to leave the old fisherman, though Manolin continues to support him with food and bait. Santiago is a mentor to the boy, who cherishes the old man and the life lessons he imparts.



The Old Man and the Sea Summary and Analysis of pages 1-18

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