Ajax and achilles playing a game

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Exekias, amphora with Ajax and Achilles playing a game

ajax and achilles playing a game

An example of black-figure painting is Achilles and Ajax Playing a Board Game on an amphora signed by Exekias as both potter and painter (at left is written.

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Achilles and Ajax, two great heroes of the Trojan War, play a board game on this Athenian black-figure amphora. Behind the table stands the goddess Athena. The scene of the warriors at leisure but with their armor at the ready might have taken place during a break in fighting the Trojan War. This file contains additional information such as Exif metadata which may have been added by the digital camera, scanner, or software program used to create or digitize it. If the file has been modified from its original state, some details such as the timestamp may not fully reflect those of the original file. The timestamp is only as accurate as the clock in the camera, and it may be completely wrong.

Two-handled jar amphora with Achilles and Ajax. Place of Manufacture: Greece, Attica, Athens. Dimensions Height: Accession Number Collections The Ancient World. Classifications Vessels.

From the beginning of the sixth to the end of the fourth centuries BC, black and red figure techniques were widely used in Athens to decorate fine pottery. Sketched into the pottery itself were decorative motifs that were often made for specific daily uses. Some of the shapes would depict storage, drinking wine or water, drawing water, etc. During the 6 th and 4 th centuries, highly skilled potters would first shape the pot on a wheel. Most of the sizeable pots were made in sections in order to ensure that the pot would be stable. Therefore, the neck and the body were often times thrown separately and the foot would then be added later. Once the clay had become leathery, the potter would then lute the joints with a slip.

Exekias is regarded by art historians as an artistic visionary whose masterful use of incision and psychologically sensitive compositions mark him as one of the greatest of all Attic vase painters. The works of Exekias are distinguished by their innovative compositions, precise draughtsmanship, and subtle psychological characterization, all of which transcend the inherent challenges of the black-figure technique. John Boardman , the eminent historian of Greek art, described Exekias' style as follows: "The hallmark of his style is a near statuesque dignity which brings vase painting for the first time close to claiming a place as a major art. Fourteen signed works by Exekias have survived, while many more have been attributed to him based on the stylistic connoisseurship method developed by John Beazley. It has been suggested that he chose to sign as painter only the works he was particularly proud of. Beazley attributed one of the vases with the potter-only signature to the so-called Group E, to which Exekias is closely related. While Exekias' work itself offers a glimpse of the culture of ancient pottery, the find spots of his vases also reveal information about the market in which Exekias positioned himself.

Terracotta amphora. The central image is a narrative scene, with geometric patterns subsumed into border devices. Figures seen as silhouettes against the light ground. Clear contours and precise lines. Details within the forms, especially the patterned cloaks and armour of Achilles, rendered by means of delicate and meticulous incision. The scene is composed to suit or fit the surface and shape of the amphora. The outlines of the figures follow the outlines of the vessel.



A Roll of the Dice for Ajax

From the beginning of the sixth to the end of the fourth centuries BC, black and red figure techniques were widely used in Athens to decorate fine pottery. Sketched into the pottery itself were decorative motifs that were often made for specific daily uses. Some of the shapes would depict storage, drinking wine or water, drawing water, etc.

Attic black-figure

If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website. To log in and use all the features of Khan Academy, please enable JavaScript in your browser. Greek Vase-Painting, an introduction. Ancient Greek vase production and the black-figure technique. Practice: Dipylon Amphora. Exekias, amphora with Ajax and Achilles playing a game. From tomb to museum: the story of the Sarpedon Krater.

In the Homeric Iliad , the hero Ajax is second best in comparison with Achilles; in the Homeric Odyssey , he is second best in comparison with Odysseus. In Chapter 2 of my book The Best of the Achaeans ; 2nd ed. As for the Odyssey , the status of Ajax as the second best is more problematic. After the death of Achilles, the possession of his armor had been contested by both Ajax and Odysseus, and the contest had been won, unfairly, by Odysseus. The cheating of Ajax by Odysseus had brought about the most tragic consequences. His intense feelings of anger had caused Ajax, in a fit of madness, to slaughter herds sacred to Athena, and this wanton slaughter led ultimately to his suicide.

Post a Comment If you are posting a story, please make sure you read the conditions of the contest on my website. Thursday, April 16, Ajax and Achiles playing a game. It was found in Vulci, Italy but was manufactured most likely in the studio of a potter named Andokides in Greece CE. The "Bilingual Amphora with scenes of two soldiers playing a game. It is not known who painted this vase.

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